Cpu articles

amd cpu gpu chip lisa su halo

AMD admits to restraining chip supply to keep higher CPU and GPU prices

"We undershipped in Q3, we undershipped in Q4," Su told investors
In context: Gamers have been lamenting about the high prices of graphics cards for what seems like forever. We all got excited when crypto mining became obsolete, just knowing that we were finally going to see prices come down, but for the most part, they haven't. The latest GPUs are still out of reach for the average consumer, and even older cards are holding their value.
intel meteor lake

Intel may have cancelled Meteor Lake desktop CPUs in favor of a Raptor Lake refresh

Rumor mill: Rumors over the last year have painted a tumultuous picture of the development of Intel's 14th-generation Meteor Lake processors. The latest information takes things a step further regarding Intel's struggles to transition from its current CPU architecture suggesting the company has canceled Meteor Lake's desktop variants. The upcoming series might be struggling to match, much less exceed, Raptor Lake's clock rates.

Explainer: What is Chip Binning?

#TBT You just bought a new CPU and it seems to run cool, so you try a bit of overclocking. The GHz climbs higher. Did you hit the silicon jackpot? You've got yourself a binned chip. But what's that exactly?

tsmc taiwan cpu chip semiconductor manufacturing opinion chipmakers

How did TSMC get so good?

There is no simple answer, but we think there are a few factors that really stand out...
The big picture: By now, we are all familiar with the fact that TSMC is, by far, the most capable semiconductor manufacturer in the world, with all the entails for the industry and geopolitics. And as this reality sets in, many people have been asking us how did they get so good?
tsmc samsung intel qualcomm cpu chip manufacturing wafer

CPU and GPU SRAM caches are not shrinking, which could increase chip cost or reduce performance

Why it matters: An interesting article posted at WikiChip discusses the severity of SRAM shrinkage problems in the semiconductor industry. Manufacturer TSMC is reporting that its SRAM transistor scaling has completely flatlined to the point where SRAM caches are staying the same size on multiple nodes, despite logic transistor densities continuing to shrink. This is not ideal, and it will force processor SRAM caches to take up more space on a microchip die. This in turn could increase manufacturing costs of the chips and prevent certain microchip architectures from becoming as small as they could potentially be.